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Snootli West Boulders - wa atl'sanks Anulhk'als

Description: 

This series of boulders are on the upstream flank of Snootli Slab / Mount Noohalk (Anulhk'als). They can be reached from the skating rink parking lot: follow the trail behind to a small road, then continue on the trail immediately on the other side of the road rather than the Snootli descent trail that begins several metres to the right. Follow this trail up the hillside for ten minutes and eventually you will arrive at the boulders. At present, I've been calling the four boulders by the names of the four mountains going upvalley from Noohalk: Noohalk (or Snootli Slab), Schoolhouse, Noosatsum, and Tabletop, but I've been using their Nuxalk names: Anulhk'als (scraped wall), Snukulhikuus (with a high forehead), Nusq'alst (place of axe-stone), and Wapat (Sideways). I've added -ii to the end of each name.

The first boulder is a slabby problem, called Anulhk'alsii (scraped wall), Little Snootli slab. There are a number of fun ways to get to the top on every side, and a very good place to introduce people to slabs and footwork.

The trail splits just beyond the first boulder and goes down the hill. Just to the right of the trail is the second boulder, Snukulhikuusii, Little Schoolhouse Peak. There are again a number of ways to get up - a few different approaches from the right corner, as well as from the left. You'll need a pad for this, as there are some nasty rocks and stumps.

A minute down the trail, and down in the trees to the left is a massive boulder called Nusq'alstii - Little mount Noosatsum. Like the mountain, it is massive. You can climb up a tree on the downhill side, and top-rope the problem on the uphill side, or you can just go for it!

Another minute along the path the trail takes a sharp turn up the hill, and off to the left of the trail twenty or so yards is the final boulder, Wapatii - Little Tabletop. This is very much what it sounds like, a broad-faced boulder with a nice edge all around the top and a few nice places to put your feet. It's a mildly pumpy traverse and a good place to practice hanging with your feet!

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Trail Status: 
visible
Length, difficulty: 
Fifteen minute hike to the back boulder, though the trail continues further to function as a descent trail from the east wall of the mountain.